Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCelis-Diez J.L., Muñoz C.E., Marquet P.A., Armesto J.J.es_CL
dc.contributor.authorAbades, Sebastián [Centro de Genómica y Bioinformatica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Mayor, Chile]es_CL
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-12T14:11:55Z
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-12T18:13:25Z
dc.date.available2020-08-12T14:11:55Z
dc.date.available2020-08-12T18:13:25Z
dc.date.issued2017es_CL
dc.identifier.citationCelis-Diez, J. L., Muñoz, C. E., Abades, S., Marquet, P. A., & Armesto, J. J. (2017). Biocultural homogenization in urban settings: Public knowledge of birds in city parks of Santiago, Chile. Sustainability, 9(4), 485.es_CL
dc.identifier.issn2071-1050es_CL
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/9/4/485es_CL
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.3390/su9040485es_CL
dc.identifier.urihttp://repositorio.umayor.cl/xmlui/handle/sibum/6911
dc.description.abstractAn understudied consequence of growing urbanization is the rapid and concurrent loss of native biological and cultural diversity. Here, we measured the concordance between avian species richness in public green areas of the city of Santiago, Chile, and the corresponding knowledge of local citizens of this avian diversity. To assess this correspondence, we sampled avian species richness in 10 representative city parks and surveyed the awareness of avian diversity by park visitors as well as their ability to identify bird species. We found no significant relationship between estimated bird diversity from field sampling and their perception by park visitors, suggesting that visitors underestimate avian diversity in city parks because they perceive only a small fraction of the overall diversity, with their awareness especially biased towards the most abundant species. Exotic bird species comprise the majority of the latter group. This result was observed regardless of whether the city park had high or low bird diversity. Public knowledge of birds did not relate to the species richness present at city parks, and was strongly biased towards the most abundant, widely distributed, and primarily exotic species. This result agrees with the biocultural homogenization hypothesis, documenting the role of urban areas in this global process.es_CL
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank A. Parra for helpful comments on earlier versions and T.Rannou for field assistance. We greatly appreciate the comments made by the editor and three anonymous reviewers that substantially improved the manuscript. S. Lazzarino helped with figures. Fondecyt 3130672 and PUCV-DI 039364/2016 to Juan L. Celis-Diez supported this work. Pablo A. Marquet and Juan J. Armesto were supported by grants from ICM-MINECON (P05-002) and CONICYT (PFB-23) to the Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity (IEB). Juan L. Celis-Diez is an affiliated researcher with IEB.es_CL
dc.format.extentArtículo original
dc.language.isoenes_CL
dc.publisherMDPI AGes_CL
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Chile
dc.sourceSustainability (Switzerland), 2017. 9(4), ART. N° 485
dc.titleBiocultural homogenization in Urban settings: Public knowledge of birds in city parks of Santiago, Chilees_CL
dc.typeArtículo o paperes_CL
umayor.facultadFacultad de Ciencias
umayor.indizadorCOT
umayor.politicas.sherpa/romeoRoMEO GREEN journal (Se puede archivar el pre-print y el post-print o versión de editor/PDF). Disponible en: http://sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/index.phpes_CL
umayor.indexadoWOSes_CL
umayor.indexadoSCOPUSes_CL
dc.identifier.doiDOI: 10.3390/su9040485es_CL]
umayor.indicadores.wos-(cuartil)Q2es_CL
umayor.indicadores.scopus-(scimago-sjr)0,58es_CL
umayor.indicadores.scopus-(scimago-sjr)ÍNDICE H: 15es_CL


Show simple item record